Library Loot: Back to the Library

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Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

 

I’m back!!!

After taking a bit of a break from the personal library to read through my owned backlog, I picked up two wonderful books from the library this week.

The first was Starbreak, a new release by Phoebe North. It follows her debut SF novel, Starglass, about a generation ship whose secular culture is based on Judaism.

The second book was one of the oldest ones on my hold list, and I’ve already finished it: a biography titled Grandma Gatewood’s Walk. This one gets its own review, later!

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What did you pick up this week?

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Aside

Library Loot: Again With the Author Bios

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Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

I’m still on an author bio binge. This week, I picked up My Salinger Year, a new release memoir, and Pearl S. Buck’s autobiography, My Several Worlds. Inspired by last week’s autobiography, One Writer’s Beginnings, I also checked out Eudora Welty’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, The Optimist’s Daughter.

 

I immediately read My Salinger Year, followed by the Welty novel. Both were wonderful. Since I’m done already, I’ll give mini-reviews here.

 

My Salinger Year successfully opens a window into another life & another world: in this case, mid-90’s  literary New York. Although I sometimes found the author’s opinions to be snobbish or unrelatable, as a reader I was able to accept that as her truth at that time and place in her life.

 

The Optimist’s Daughter had the feel of a long short story to me; it was just one of those books that slowly reveals things about the characters. I was also reminded (oddly) of the book of Job, based on structure if not content. Unfortunately, there are a lot of biographical pieces from Welty’s life wedged in the book, and the echo back to her autobiography were disruptive for me as a reader. I would not recommend reading One Writer’s Beginnings and The Optimist’s Daughter back to back.

 

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What did you pick up this week?