Library Loot: New Release Loot

librarylootnew

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

I picked up two new releases from the library, and can’t decide which to read first!! Malice at the Palace is #9 in what is probably the most consistently good series I’ve ever read, set in 1930s Britain. And Circling the Sun is new historical fiction  by the author of The Paris Wife about a real-life aviatrix from the 1920s: Beryl Markham. If you haven’t heard of Beryl Markham before, or if the library wait is just too long, I recommend her autobiography, West with the Night.

 

circling Malice

 

What did you pick up this week?

Library Loot: Back for the Summer

librarylootnewLibrary Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!

I’m back to the library after spending a month or two reading through my backlist of ‘owned’ books. It feels wonderful, and so RIGHT, to be hauling out sacks of books from the library on a hot(ish) summer day!! Here’s a few selections:

What did you pick up this week?

vander

From a favorite blogger

brightplaces

I forgot how annoying teenagers are!

bspec

A new – and bookish – release

Read-through Reviews: More New Gluten Free Cookbooks

Wrapping up gluten-free cookbook week on the blog, I’ll review the final two cookbooks from my library loot. Check out my first two reviews if you haven’t already.

photoI check out a lot of cookbooks from the library. When I get them home, I do a quick read-through of each one to make sure that it’s something that fits my family’s tastes and needs. In the area of gluten-free cooking especially, some books may rely on a flour or ingredient that we don’t use. Do I want to spend my time making substitutions in an unfamiliar cookbook, or move on to something that’s a better fit?

 

3. The Gluten Free Vegetarian Family Cookbook by Susan O’Brien

So far, I’ve reviewed only baking books, so although we’re not vegetarians, I was excited to look through some what’s-for-dinner recipes.

The style of the cookbook was very simple: black and white, one page per recipe, with a few color pages for pictures in the middle. Flipping through the cookbook, I noticed a great feature: the top outside corner of some pages marked with a gray disk reading “Quick and Easy”. This made it really easy to zero in on the recipes I was most likely to try.

Even though the breakfast section was mostly baked goods involving vegan ingredients like almond meal, coconut oil and palm sugar that we don’t normally eat, I found a few recipes that I want to try. The teff and chia seed waffles sounded good, mostly because I have a bag of each laying around that I don’t know what to do with. I hope the teff waffles don’t taste like horse feed like the last thing I made with teff.  There are also two protein bar recipes – one a fairly standard oat-seed-peanut butter-brown rice syrup concoction that I’ve probably made before, and another made from all seeds and brown rice syrup that is recommended for a pre exercise snack.

The rest of the cookbook was some serious veggie lovin’ – even the stuffed mushrooms were veggie stuffed. This is no starch, tofu, and fake meat cookbook – it reminded me more of the Moosewood cookbooks, especially the low fat one. While I would have eaten most of the recipes, my veggie-averse family wouldn’t, so I moved on…

4. Let Them Eat Cake – by Gesine Bullock-Prado

Ahh. Back to baking. This cookbook doesn’t even bother with boring bread and muffins – it’s all dessert. It’s also not strictly a gluten-free cookbook. Rather, it offers gluten free variations as well as vegan and “healthy” ones.

l admit it. I went straight to the Pop-tarts. And I wondered: would the author offer me an actual alternate gluten-free recipe, or just tell me to substitute a GF blend? Because I could do that with any cookbook. As it turns out, the recipe does provide a reasonable looking sorghum/brown rice flour blend with potato starch and tapioca, although the resulting dough is noted as “delicate to work with”. Some of the other recipes, like the brownie variations, had a much sketchier flour substitution – cornstarch.

I found the cookbook hard to browse; although it was in color, most of the color was dedicated to cute formatting, borders, and boxes for all the variations. There were few pictures, and I found myself skipping through recipes. In the end, the recipes I found were similar to ones I have in other cookbooks already, like Samoas – try The Ultimate Gluten Free Cookie Cookbook if your ears perked up for that one – coffee cake, cherry pie. ice creams. There were some really fancy cakes if you’re into that, but I’m not. In the end, this cookbook just wasn’t the right fit for me.

Final Haul: Two more cookbooks back in the bin, but I finally get to use up that bag of teff.

Remember, I haven’t tried any recipes from these cookbooks yet. Have you? If so, please post here and add your recommendation!

Read-through Reviews: New Gluten Free Cookbooks

Earlier this week, I posted about my library loot: four new gluten-free cookbooks!

photo

I check out a lot of cookbooks from the library. When I get them home, I do a quick read-through of each one to make sure that it’s something that fits my family’s tastes and needs. In the area of gluten-free cooking especially, some books may rely on a flour or ingredient that we don’t use. Do I want to spend my time making substitutions in an unfamiliar cookbook, or move on to something that’s a better fit?

1. Bread & Butter by Erin McKenna

Written by the author/owner of BabyCakes, this is no simple bread cookbook: It’s all about everything bread – first the recipes, and then what you can do with what you’ve made. Loaves, sandwiches, pizza, crackers, pastry, dips and spreads, and sweet breads (but no muffins or cupcakes). It does have a few odd entries like kale chips – are those just obligatory now? – but overall presents a comprehensive collection of bread recipes, from a basic white loaf to puff pastry to Ethiopian bread.

My family’s take: We don’t eat yeast, so bread books are tricky. Some, but not all, gluten-free bread cookbooks include yeast-free loaves: Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread gives it a good try; Celeste’s Best is a lot more successful. Bread and Butter doesn’t even go there. But I am eager to try some of the cracker recipes: imitation cheez-its, Ritz crackers, and wheat thins look promising. Since most of the recipes include gluten-free oat flour, we’ll have to add that to our repertoire before trying anything out.

2. Gluten-Free Flour Power by Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot

This thick cookbook covers much of the same turf as Bread and Butter, plus adds in pasta and desserts. It looks – and reads – like a more serious cookbook, with lots of detailed instructions and pictures. The format reminded me of the America’s Test Kitchen series, and some of the recipes – kimchi cavatelli with bulgogi sauce – were too ambitious for my purposes.

But can I find some good recipes in it for my family?: The first thing I noticed is this is one of those “flour blend” cookbooks. They offer you three possible flour blends up-front. One, the low-allergy blend containing tapioca flour, sweet rice flour, arrowroot, sorghum, potato flour, and golden flaxseed meal, will work for us. Once again, though, the yeast bread section is just that — all yeast breads, followed by yeasted flatbreads and puff pastry. They’ve even got yeast in the bundt cakes (which are numerous).

I was almost ready to set this book aside, when I found the microwave sweet rice cakes. They’re based on traditional Japanese mochi, but made from sweet rice flour. They look so easy and delicious, and can be served with sweet or savory accompaniments. The authors suggest grilled shrimp or fresh berries and ginger ice cream.

From there, it gets better: peanut butter blondies, chocolate piecrust, and banana butterfinger cream pie all sound good.

Final Haul: A few recipes to try (Ritz crackers and microwave sweet rice cakes)  before putting these two books back in the library bin. I’ll review the other two books in a later post.

Remember, I haven’t tried any recipes from these cookbooks yet. Have you? If so, please post here and add your recommendation!

Library Loot: Four New Gluten-Free Cookbooks

librarylootnew

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

For some reason, I got a huge haul of gluten-free cookbooks this week. I’m especially excited about Bread and Butter, which is by the author of Babycakes. I’m hoping I can sneak some Gluten-Free Vegetarian Family Cookbook recipes by my husband, who is a meat-and-potatoes guy. Gluten-Free Flour Power is the thickest book of the bunch, and Let Them Eat Cake is a regular cookbook with GF variations.

photo

 

What did you pick up this week?

Library Loot: This Book Doesn’t Like That Book

librarylootnew

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

This week I had two great pieces of library loot:

The first was Prudence, the first in a new adult series by Gail Carriger. As much as I’ve enjoyed her YA series, they didn’t quite scratch the same itch as the Parasol Protectorate (Changeless, Blameless, etc.) I snatched the  beautiful shiny new purple-and-red book off the hold shelf, and then saw what else was waiting for me.

I also had You Learn by Living (1960) by Eleanor Roosevelt. I picked this up as a recommendation from Modern Mrs. Darcy, when she recommended book flights that go together. I skipped the flight and just went with what interested me from her list. She says: “You Learn by Living is Roosevelt’s memoir/advice manual about living the good life. You’ll appreciate just how hard-won that advice was when you read No Ordinary Time (warning: it’s 800 pages).” So, I put You Learn By Living on hold and skipped the other one.

At the library check-out, the librarian saw these two books and started laughing. Not a quiet little librarian chuckle, either. She actually laughed out loud, then lined the two books up side by side, like this, so that the two ladies were looking at each other:

prudence Eroos

“What do you think SHE [Eleanor] would have thought of HER [Prudence]?” the librarian asked, still laughing.

I answered, “Oh, you might be surprised.”

What did you pick up this week? Did it make your librarian laugh?

Library Loot: HUGE book haul for Winter

librarylootnew

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

This week, I picked up so many books that I brought my husband with me to the library, kind of like my own personal footman. (Ooh… sweetie… are you reading this? Sorry.) I even got a bunch of crochet and knitting books, adding to my project list. I’m snugging in for winter!! Where should I start?

Each image is linked to the Goodreads entry for that book.

vanessa

I loved Parmar’s debut novel, Exit the Actress!

woods

Uh-oh – looks like a college textbook.

sugar

I can’t remember who recommended this one!

snow

New release, with mixed reviews. My turn!

sari

“A tale of women and power in India”

rooms

I have been reading a lot of books about houses lately.

pool

Favorite author – but second checkout for this book.

pioneer

YES! yes yes yes yes yes!

magician

New release! This was a Wishing and Waiting post from Bookshelf Fantasies.

lively

Is it a bad idea to read an author’s memoir before you read any of her books?

lila

Loved Housekeeping, but DNF’ed Gilead. Not sure Lila is a good idea?

liars

This is one of those “must reads” that I don’t have much enthusiasm for.

killer

Because I loved The Wicked Girls.

forget

Because Halloween is all year round.