Thursday Quotables: A Quiet Heroism

It’s a quiet sort of heroism, the making and keeping of books.

You don’t get medals for sitting in the library each day, scratching away, writing it all down. Still less for dusting the shelves. But it is what civilisation is made of: the collective memory, passed on, passed down.

— Katherine Swift, The Morville Hours

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Thursday Quotables is a weekly event hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies!
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Library Loot: This Book Doesn’t Like That Book

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Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

This week I had two great pieces of library loot:

The first was Prudence, the first in a new adult series by Gail Carriger. As much as I’ve enjoyed her YA series, they didn’t quite scratch the same itch as the Parasol Protectorate (Changeless, Blameless, etc.) I snatched the  beautiful shiny new purple-and-red book off the hold shelf, and then saw what else was waiting for me.

I also had You Learn by Living (1960) by Eleanor Roosevelt. I picked this up as a recommendation from Modern Mrs. Darcy, when she recommended book flights that go together. I skipped the flight and just went with what interested me from her list. She says: “You Learn by Living is Roosevelt’s memoir/advice manual about living the good life. You’ll appreciate just how hard-won that advice was when you read No Ordinary Time (warning: it’s 800 pages).” So, I put You Learn By Living on hold and skipped the other one.

At the library check-out, the librarian saw these two books and started laughing. Not a quiet little librarian chuckle, either. She actually laughed out loud, then lined the two books up side by side, like this, so that the two ladies were looking at each other:

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“What do you think SHE [Eleanor] would have thought of HER [Prudence]?” the librarian asked, still laughing.

I answered, “Oh, you might be surprised.”

What did you pick up this week? Did it make your librarian laugh?

Library Loot: HUGE book haul for Winter

librarylootnew

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by The Captive Reader and Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

This week, I picked up so many books that I brought my husband with me to the library, kind of like my own personal footman. (Ooh… sweetie… are you reading this? Sorry.) I even got a bunch of crochet and knitting books, adding to my project list. I’m snugging in for winter!! Where should I start?

Each image is linked to the Goodreads entry for that book.

vanessa

I loved Parmar’s debut novel, Exit the Actress!

woods

Uh-oh – looks like a college textbook.

sugar

I can’t remember who recommended this one!

snow

New release, with mixed reviews. My turn!

sari

“A tale of women and power in India”

rooms

I have been reading a lot of books about houses lately.

pool

Favorite author – but second checkout for this book.

pioneer

YES! yes yes yes yes yes!

magician

New release! This was a Wishing and Waiting post from Bookshelf Fantasies.

lively

Is it a bad idea to read an author’s memoir before you read any of her books?

lila

Loved Housekeeping, but DNF’ed Gilead. Not sure Lila is a good idea?

liars

This is one of those “must reads” that I don’t have much enthusiasm for.

killer

Because I loved The Wicked Girls.

forget

Because Halloween is all year round.

 

Giving Back, part 1

Young professional dilemma: How do you give back to your community?

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You work all day. So the ladies’ social improvement clubs are definitely off the list. Not that they were ever on the list in the first place, really.

You travel for business, and it’s unpredictable. So anything that requires a recurring weeknight commitment is going to be a problem.

Weekends, well, that MIGHT work – assuming you haven’t relocated for your job. Adrift in a city and away from your support network, you might find yourself traveling most weekends to visit family and old friends.

And speaking of weekends? Good luck finding – and participating in community service with – a church when you’re gone half the time. Even if you can brave the storm of church ladies asking where you’ve been.

So you look for one-time opportunities, and schedule things in where you can. Except for some reason, even after doing buckets of paperwork for the Girl Scouts and the local women’s shelter, who are advertising like mad that they need help, you never get a call back.

You’re about to reconcile yourself to only being involved through your checkbook when you see on the library website: Better World Books community service project. They’re accepting book donations (YES!) and also need volunteers to sort and pack books. Schedules are (wow) flexible. How perfect! Sharing your love of books with the world, uncluttering your bookshelf, and spending more time at the library.

Problem solved. Maybe. (Part 2)

Oh, and in case you’re wondering about Better World Books: “Better World Books uses the power of business to change the world. We collect and sell books online to donate books and fund literacy initiatives worldwide. With more than 8 million new and used titles in stock, we’re a self-sustaining, triple-bottom-line company that creates social, economic and environmental value for all our stakeholders.”